Browsing Category

Industry Events

Extra, Industry Events, Products

And The Winner Is…..

Our Follower Appreciation Book Giveaway Winner Is…..

Fabian Salcedo

F2 Floral Design

Austin, Tx

11728814_456125841228296_5645379123296764132_o

 

Fabian has won an autographed copy of
BCFLBook
A FRESH LOOK AT JUDGING FLORAL DESIGN
BY HITOMI GILLIAM AIFD AND KATHY WHALEN AIFD

 

 

Congratulations to Fabian and thank you for your support. To all those that participated in the giveaway, we thank you and we look forward to doing giveaways in the future!

Huge thank you again for taking us past the 1500 follower mark, Floral.today looks forward to our exciting floral filled future.

Siignature

Featured Floral School, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

University of Missouri

In today’s floral education climates you are bound to find fewer and fewer university funded Floral Design programs yet the University of Missouri – Columbia is keeping their floral program strong within the Division of Plant Sciences in Horticultural Landscape and Design degree programs. Within their 5 course program the students also get the valuable experience of running a fully operational store and event business, Tiger Garden, that is attached to the classroom.

This year the University of Missouri SAIFD Chapter has 4 designers participating at the prestigious American Institute of Floral Designers Symposium Student Design Contest in Denver so make sure to say hello and wish them luck for all of you going to Symposium this year!

YOU CAN FIND ALL THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE University of Missouri  AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

What advice do you have for designers looking to become a university floral educator or advisor?

I would tell any designers who are looking to become a university floral educator or advisor that, as an educator, you are never done learning. Take advantage of learning each and every day, whether that is from your students or other members in the floral community. Any opportunity that is available to you, use it to grow your floral knowledge. I also believe that to be a great educator, you need to know how to properly communicate with students and work with them. It is great to have floral knowledge, but you also need an education background.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

What has been one of the most interesting floral topics you have taught so far at the University of Missouri?

One of the most interesting floral topics that we have taught would be unique personal pieces, including traditional corsages, fascinators, and contemporary bouquets.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

Do you have a philosophy when it comes to floral education?

I believe that my floral education philosophy goes hand in hand with my teaching philosophy. We have to, as educators, reach out and help students see and reach attainable goals within the floral industry. I want students to be able to believe, dream and achieve and with teaching the right techniques and ideas, the possibilities will be endless for students. Education is always first in my mind. If students aren’t learning and growing, then you are doing nothing for them or yourself.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

Who do you find are the most influential designers or outlets for young designers?

I believe that the most influential designers and outlets for young designers can be found anywhere. From following them on social media to volunteering in the workroom at symposium, I believe that you can find influence anywhere and everywhere you look.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

How much support do university floral programs receive and do you think it is enough to insure a strong future for the floral industry?

I believe that our program receives a good amount of support by our college. When looking at the bigger picture, members of AIFD are very supportive of our program and are always willing to help. As long as the seasoned members of AIFD continue to help and be part of our program, then I believe our program will be at the University for another 100 years.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

With our ever-changing industry, where do you see floral education heading in the next 10-15 years?

Within the next 10-15 years, I see floral education becoming even more diverse than it already is. Right now, we are learning from designers from around the world at symposium and other shows. Eventually, I think that we will start having more blogs that are showing more how to and allowing designers to be more open.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

What are some of the best opportunities available to young designers?

In my opinion, some of the best opportunities that we can offer to young designers are already in place. From our introductory courses, the student run shop, to taking as many students as possible to AIFD National Symposium and by giving students the opportunities to go to design courses offered throughout the year by AIFD members. There are far more opportunities available than many of us realize, but these are several opportunities that we do our best to make possible for the young designers.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

What do you think are some of the top floral educational advancements that have helped progress the industry?

Some of the top floral educational advancements that are helping progress the industry are those of social media. By allowing designers to showcase their talents and designs on social media and posting videos, it allows the younger generations to be able to have resources at their disposal.

Do you believe the US floral industry does enough to create interest and jobs for future designers?

As of right now, I believe the industry could do a little more to create interest. AIFD is not something that most people know of. I think that there are a lot of great programs, growers and designers out there that no one knows about because we are such a tight-knit community.

Photo Property of The University of Missouri

In your personal opinion what are some of the shortcomings in floral education that the industry should strive towards working on?

Some shortcomings that I believe the industry should shrive to work towards:

1) Getting younger people involved in the industry and help them to become successful.

2) We are going to have to work harder at showcasing the floral industry as an art and not so much as a hobby. Although social media is a way to spread good word about the industry, it also has the ability to make everything look so easy and of lesser value.

University of Missouri – Columbia and Tiger Garden

Contact Information:

Website:
University of Missouri – Columbia ~ missouri.edu
Tiger Garden ~ tigergarden.missouri.edu
Email: tigergarden@missouri.edu
Phone: 573.884.1191


Social Media
Facebook
Flickr

 

Photo Property of University of Missouri

University of Missouri SAIFD 2015 Student AIFD Symposium Competitors

 

Good luck to all those competing at this years AIFD Symposium and to the future of the University of Missouri – Columbia and Tiger Garden programs. It’s always great to see students getting exposed to the industry and professionals so one day they can be in the shoes of those they are exposed to.

Tomorrow is our last day of Floral Education Month!

Siignature

Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events, Products

Top 3 Floral Education Month Book Picks!

 

Floral.today does realize that there are so many amazing floral design books that inspire and teach out there but these are our top 3 educational book picks of right now in no particular order. What floral books have helped teach you and lead you to be a better designer?

Share with us in the comments Below your top 3 favorite floral book for Floral Education Month!

A Fresh Look At Judging Floral Design, A Guide for Judges, Designers, Teachers, Mentors and Host

by Hitomi Gilliam AIFD and Kathy Whalen AIFD

Image Property of HITOMI GILLIAM AIFD AND KATHY WHALEN AIFD

Acculades

2014 Winner of Two Gold Medals

Best Education Book – Independent publisher

Best Reference book – Independent publisher

2014 Silver Medal

Best Professional/technical book – Independent publisher

Image Property of HITOMI GILLIAM AIFD AND KATHY WHALEN AIFD

WHAT KIND OF BOOK IS THE BOOK IS A Fresh Look At Judging Floral Design, A Guide for Judges, Designers, Teachers, Mentors and Host?

A Fresh Look At Judging Floral Design is a book that fills a void in publishing on the topic of floral design and judging. It’s been 50 + years since a new work solely dedicated to design and judging design has been published in the United States. The book is a reference book that has many “workbook-like” features, and thus is unique. Many around the globe are also using it as a textbook.

For years Elements and Principles of Design have been at the core of teaching design. A Fresh Look At Judging reinforces that foundation, and expands design knowledge by providing new opportunities for analyzing and understanding floral design from the judge’s, teacher’s and designer’s perspectives. Among the topics people are excited about is the introduction of tangible and aesthetic standards, bringing greater clarity and more logical analysis to designing and judging. – Kathy Whalen AIFD

Image Property of HITOMI GILLIAM AIFD AND KATHY WHALEN AIFD Image Property of HITOMI GILLIAM AIFD AND KATHY WHALEN AIFD

Image Property of HITOMI GILLIAM AIFD AND KATHY WHALEN AIFD


A Fresh Look At Judging Floral Design, A Guide for Judges, Designers, Teachers, Mentors and Host


Contact Information:

Book Website: JudgingFloralDesign.com
Email: aFreshLook@JudgingFloralDesign.com
Facebook: A Fresh Look at Judging Floral Design

Purchase
$ 99.95 +shipping & tax

Certified Florist Manual

Photo Property of Michigan Floral Association

What’s a Certified Florist?

“Your Michigan Floral Association has created an exciting certification program for retail florists called the Certified Florist (CF for short). In this program, a Certified Florist is one who both possesses professional expertise and passes a certification process.” – Michigan Floral Association

Benefits 
Retail Florist Shop Owners

Become your area’s most respected florist.
Learn the best current practices from recognized floral professionals.
Great advertising tool for your flower shop.
Freshen up on design skills.
Learn the latest design trends.
Use the accreditation’s logo and advertising tools to build credibility with your community.
Great networking opportunity.

Retail Florist Employees

Build your skills.
Make yourself more valuable to your employer.
Job Security.

Free-lance Designers

Keep up on current trends.
Great networking opportunity.
Learn the best current practices from recognized floral professionals.
Freshen up on design skills.

Floristry Students

Build your skills.
Make yourself more employable in the industry.

Party and Event Designers

Keep up on current trends.
Great networking opportunity.
Learn the best current practices from recognized floral professionals.
Freshen up on design skills.


Certified Florist Manual

Contact Information:

Website: Certified Florist Manual
Email: cindy@michiganfloral.org
Phone:Phone: (517) 575-0110

Purchase
$399.95 ~ All Inclusive

NEOTROPICA: HAWAII FLOWER & PLANT GUIDE

by Hitomi Gilliam AIFD, Lois Hiranga AIFD, & Colin Gilliam

Photo Property of Design358

What will you find in NEOTROPICA: HAWAII FLOWER & PLANT GUIDE

“The softback is illustrated with four-color photos taken on location in Hawaii and offers valuable info on product nomenclature, availability and seasonality.With a pictorial catalog format, the guide is organized into “cut” and “plant” products and by commodity groups.

Readers will find 180 varieties of orchids, 120 anthuriums, 108 assorted tropicals, 90 proteas, 90 types of foliage, 36 green plants, 20 bromeliads and a dozen leis.” ~ Hawaii Tropical Flower Council


NEOTROPICA: HAWAII FLOWER & PLANT GUIDE

Contact Information:

Website: NEOTROPICA: HAWAII FLOWER & PLANT GUIDE
Email: info@design358.com

Purchase
$15.00 +shipping

What books inspire you or have helped make you a better floral designer? Share with us below in the comments or on our Floral.today social media!

Till Next Time,

Siignature

Feature Designer, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

Bill Schaffer AIFD, AAF, PFCI and Kristine Kratt AIFD, PFCI – SCHAFFER DESIGNS

 Floral.today is always interested to see the next big thing or trend and SCHAFFER DESIGNS team is never far from the action. Bill Schaffer AIFD, AAF, PFCI and Kristine Kratt AIFD, PFCI have been at the helm of the 2013, 2014 and 2015 Floral Trend Forecast for the International Floral Distributors Group, multi-awards winning Philadelphia Flower Show winners along with a long list of other amazing achievements and accolades.

When we asked for a break down of their business to Floral.today and our viewers, here’s what they had to say.

MEANT TO BE   Flowers and fate led to Bill Schaffer and Kristine Kratt’s first meeting in 2005, and they have been taking the flower world by storm ever since. A 3rd generation floral designer; Bill literally grew up in the floral industry. From sweeping floors to delivering and designing flowers after school, being a part of the family business instilled in him a lifelong passion for flowers and floral design. Kris cultivated her floral career as a teenager, managing a retail flower shop in the San Francisco Bay Area, and graduated from the Floriculture program at the College of San Mateo.

ON THE EDGE   As can be seen from their Award-Winning, Gold Medal, Best-in-Show exhibits at the Philadelphia Flower Show, Bill and Kris’ work demonstrates both ability to combine their creative vision and technical skills to break out of age-old flower stereotypes to bring flower enthusiasts exquisite, and, at times, unexpected floral creations that tantalize the eye and infuse the public’s view of flowers with new energy.

FULL CIRCLE Bill and Kris continually strive to further their personal design knowledge via channels both within and outside of the floral industry. They have become diverse contributors within the floral industry, specializing in event design, floral art installations, design shows, and workshops, as well as extending into merchandising, showroom installations, and overseas product development and national and international design publications. In addition to numerous solo presentations, this cutting-edge couple has been seen presenting together at numerous conferences across the U.S.

SPECIAL PROJECTS   Bill and Kris are the owners of Schaffer Designs and creators of multiple award-winning exhibits at the Philadelphia Flower Show, including Best-In-Show and Gold Medalists for 2007, 2011-2015. They have been selected as the 2013-2016 Floral Trend Forecast Directors for the International Floral Distributors Group, and are the creators of PAFA IN BLOOM; an international floral art project with The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. They are first time authors of their book: Taking The Flower Show Home. When not traveling, they reside in Philadelphia, PA with their pug; Betty Pancake.

IMG_6177

YOU CAN FIND ALL THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR SCHAFFER DESIGNS AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE
What has been one of the most interesting floral topics you have taught so far in your career?

DESIGN ON THE EDGE was the program that we presented at the 2014, 100th Anniversary of the Texas State Floral Associations Convention. It was an introspective, first-hand account on the growth of design from within. It was based on how an individual’s life environments and experiences directly affect the reality of the work that they produce. It was a detailed retrospective of each of our individual styles and how when 2 artists, with different backgrounds, work in harmony with each other: the unity of their experience can pour forth in a new form of design.

14991475435_947b14d862_o

Without giving away all your secrets, where do you go to educate yourself about trends and staying ahead of the times?

Trends come from all around us. On a local and regional level it is about keeping your eyes open and your objectivity in check. Look around you: Neon Sneakers, bold and graphic patterns, blue everywhere. We live in a global economy and it has fallen to that vision to understand that trends are everywhere and of what we decide they should be. From the traditional European and Asian floral design magazines through Architectural Digest, Wallpaper, Print, 3D Artist, Azure, Aesthetica, InDesign and so many more to our latest craze of Pinterest, Facebook and Instagram. The fashion runways and paint companies and car companies are forever showing us colors. In the end – are there specific trends to follow in order to ‘stay ahead of the times?’ – some – but it is often your inner creativity mixing the massive amount of input from the world around us that will allow the creative mind to see the combinations of color, texture and pattern that will set the tone for others to follow.

IMG_3822

Do you have a philosophy when it comes to floral education?

This is really what it’s all about – isn’t it? A couple of floral educators espousing their belief system. What we can truly say is that our educational values and goals for those under our tutelage is ever-evolving. Even for those not under our direct contact but for those that we have the opportunity to connect with through presentations and social media – the single most predominant answer is enthusiasm. To be energetic in your beliefs about what you are doing. To be knowledgeable in traditional stylings blended and standing alone with current and future trend forecasts. To enter into a pact with your audience through honesty and a personal commitment to continue in your own growth is the constant that each of us endeavor to commit to in every aspect of our floral education process.

DSC_0411

DSC_0742

What advice do you have for designers looking to become a floral educator or presenter?

RUN!!! RUN FLORIST, RUN!!! Oh, your serious! LOL!!! When we look at teachers in our lives, family and friends who are teachers – there seems to be a connecting thread ~ heartbreak mixed with love and the opportunity to mold those who truly want to learn makes their job a vocation. As an Educator or Presenter in the floral industry you need to embrace that the people who are there to hear you and see what you produce have taken the extra step of deciding to be there. To spend their hard-earned income; to be a part of an opportunity that they are looking to you to help them fulfill requires your own successful education. Do not tread lightly onto this path. Tread heavily with honesty, knowledge, experience, education, commitment and enthusiasm – because in your voice is the power to make or break someone’s beliefs. Never be dishonest or guess in your opinions or answers to their queries.   Be forthright – this is not an easy profession. It is fraught with anxiety, competition and difficult daily dealings. Yelp! Alone – can send someone over the edge. It is about finding who you are and helping others to find their strengths. Never be egotistical – always be sincere.

IMG_5341

With our ever-changing industry, what are some of the biggest floral education changes that have happened in the last 10-15 years?

AWARENESS through the internet. The simple opportunity to find others of like mind and style or of a quality of design and style that you strive to achieve is endless. To discover learning environments through keyword searches and reviews truly are some of the ways the industry has progressed. The old school camaraderies – found in presentations with 200-300 people at every local event – has been replaced by individuals with serious attitudes looking to advance their professionalism through design. It is up to true designers to consistently post images of quality, strong P&E designs that will elevate the field not only for those seeking to learn about design, but will also educate the everyday consumer. The internet is also a consumer and design curse as the continuation of ‘bad’ ‘arrangements’ are forever displayed with words of wild enthusiasm from those posting. This is an all-encompassing good vs. evil outlet that each individual needs to explore through their personal connections and serious research about the individuals and companies that they are following. In the end – the rewards are worth the time and energy put into it.

IMG_5877

How has being on a husband/wife team helped with your floral education success?

By inspiring each other we can better inspire others. Working together – we find we constantly challenge each other’s skills, ideas and creativity. We are able to push each other without inner-tension because we both realize that the love we have for one another and our craft supersedes commentary.

LoveShackPhoto_1107

LoveShackPhoto_1329

What do you think are some of the top floral educational advancements that have helped progress the industry?

The scientific research of proper Care and Handling. The social media awareness of floral ‘ideas’. Being able to share content and ‘how-to’s’ with each other is the #1 advancement of our times. As for tools to enhance that education: the advancement of floral life expectancy through floral foam and it’s many sizes and shapes has been key to the creative mind’s ability to place flowers where, heretofore, could not be achieved. From zipties, to colored floral foam – from a myriad of water ‘tube’ options to products like yarn, wire, and numerous other textiles have aided in the creation of strong, clean mechanics that actually enhance a design.

Floral Design Show and Workshop with Schaffer Designs at Mt Eden Floral (3)

What countries do you think offer the best floral education?

Quality education can be found everywhere when looked for. As a single country ~ We have not studied enough in every floral-heightened awareness country of the world to be a true judge of it. When looking at the international postings and magazines, countries throughout Europe to Down Under and back up to Russia and China to the many Island countries of Asia can true inspiration be found. Our own backyard of the United States has a wealth of rewarding floral educational opportunities. In this ever-shrinking world: it is the amalgamation of talented educators worldwide that should be the source for expanding floral knowledge.

IMG_4307

What opportunities do think are a must that designers should take part in to help advance themselves?

To Advance oneself is to move forward. We have already discussed the various educational opportunities that can be found so what’s left is your career. Who do you want to be when you grow up?! Advance toward that. If you wish to be successful – educate and continue to educate yourself. You must also begin the networking process of your profession. Local, Regional and National Meetings/Conventions/Symposiums – wherever you can meet people and exchange ideas about what it is you do and how what you do can be of benefit to another. Learn to be your own SEO or hire one if you are able. Keep putting yourself out there. …and … for goodness sake buy a hi-res camera and take professional looking pictures on professional backdrops or everything else you have strived to achieve may never come to fruition if you cannot properly show what you can do.

14968871251_9947951f29_o

In your personal opinion what are some of the shortcomings in floral education that the industry should strive towards working on?

No standardized floral design curriculum in today’s colleges are offered across the United States. Each individual State Floral Association has their own requirements to reach certification. Challenge; not every one of our 50 states has a floral association. The major obstacle is that the people mediating these approvals are not always qualified to be doing so. The majority are well-intentioned individuals, but who may not necessarily be properly/formally educated themselves.

Today, an average design presentation, whether offered with a small charge or even with no charge – is poorly attended. A count of 50 people is now considered a success. In focusing on any one region of the United States you may find that there are 3-4 design presentations per year – each lasting no more than 2-3 hours. Those that have a hands-on workshop attached to them are even less – usually no more than 1 or 2 per year and consisting of a one-day or half-day study. For those with the financial fortitude and free time, they can be involved in continuing educational studies through these programs year-round.

Even with the shrinking numbers of design seminars, workshops and demonstrations – there are many ways to feed your appetite for learning. Weeding through the internet glut may be tedious but it can also unveil numerous quality floral educational videos and photographs. There are private schools of study in the United States that offer one, two, three week study programs and more. The lack of a standardized educational studies program is the drawback. For those who seek to follow this road they are often met with repetitive studies in dealing with instructors whose skill level is greatly differentiated from one program to the next. The difficulty is not in the financial commitment to the actual program itself but in the additional costs necessary for transportation, accommodations and time-off from their source of income as they try to earn and learn at the same time.

In order to educate the consumer we must first accept the complexity of regional aesthetics to proceed. In just considering that the United States is 2.5 times the size of Western Europe the scale of the acceptable universal design style is dwarfed by any one design concept. The universal cooperation and coordination of standardized guidelines for approaching the education process of the floral designer and the consumer would benefit all in the floral industry – worldwide. A cooperative effort by growers, wholesalers, event designers, retail flower shops, educators and publishers is the key to creating this phoenix of floristry (check out what Alison Bradley is doing with Floral Fundamentals). Without true national standards, this lowered expectational attitude of what we do has become the current face of U.S. floral design.

In the United States, the American Institute of Floral Designers has instituted a secondary program entitled CFD or Certified Floral Designer. It basically represents: a designer who has dedicated or re-dedicated themselves to improving the nature of their skills to a higher level. It is a wonderful altruistic goal but as a non-profit organization AIFD is limited in it’s marketing efforts for this unity of knowledge and spirit of design. There are few agencies that are financially able to actually market flowers. We are in a constant state of reaction – hence the never-ending negative flower ads at holidays. It is only SAF that has any ability to nationally stand up for our industry. Even then – most do not even listen.

The ever-evolving, social media marketplace is the future of most industries – the floral industry is no exception. How often does posting a picture of a floral design on today’s social media offerings evoke a “WOW”, “GREAT”, BEAUTIFUL” – Too often! Encouragement is a necessary equation in the education process. Arbitrarily praising every posted floral design will never offer any positive critical analysis of a designer’s work (there are a couple of Facebook Groups that encourage qualified commentary). The advocacy of these postings needs to be stopped by industry peers. It only provokes similar postings; which is being seen by more and more potential consumers.  In this YouTube, Vine, Vimeo world: Principles and Elements often take a backseat to quick designs as a substitution for informed education. It is the epitome of the American mentality – Convenience.

Social media perceptions can be manipulated through industry saturation of well-designed, properly photographed commercial designs by industry leaders. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. need to be a part of the daily education of floral designers in spreading the word of good floral design. There are many individual designers and shops that are already doing it. The balance of the industry needs to adapt these accomplished methods into their own strategy if the wish is to educate the consumer on the value of flowers.

IMG_9415


SCHAFFER DESIGNS

Website: www.schafferdesigns.com
Email: Bill - bill@schafferdesigns.com
Kris - kris@schafferdesigns.com
Phone: 267.577.8555
214.636.9913

Floral Trend Forecast
Social Media

Facebook
Twitter

Thank you Bill and Kris for always inspiring the industry and always keeping us on our toes with amazing design and trend. We look forward to the upcoming trends and also all the amazing projects that the SCHAFFER DESIGNS team will be coming up with in the future.

As we enter the final stretch of Floral Education Month, watch out for more amazing inspiration,

Siignature

Feature Designer, Featured Floral School, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

Matthew Landers Academy – Matthew Landers

From the day Joseph Massie introduced Matthew Lander and Floral.today to each other, we have been enjoying every second! Matthew has a wonderful passion for design along with a fun infectious personality. The Matthew Landers Academy may be young, being only established in July 2012, but it is one of the most on-trend and industry advancing academy’s offering courses to the industry today. Matthew Landers Academy is the largest Private Training Provider in Western Australia and has courses available for Hobbyist, Beginners, along with Industry and Advanced training courses.

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

YOU CAN FIND ALL THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR MAtthew Landers and Matthew LAnders Academy AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE
Where have you found the greatest impact when teaching floral design, demonstrations or workshops?

The greatest impact for myself would be teaching techniques. There have been many occasions where intermediate or senior floral designers have come to us to further their skills and in fact have been poorly taught or self-taught. I believe our greatest impact is teaching thoroughly the correct use of the sundries and supplies that are designed and engineered for botanical product and our industry. I also feel we have impacted many Beginners who thought it would be ‘easy’. Teaching them that there is indeed training, skills and education that is required to become a Floral Designer.

What struggles have you found with teaching floral education to the public compared to professional designers?

To be honest, the public are generally better students. They’re keen to learn and listen to what you have to say. Floral Designers tend to have already made up their own mind and ‘know better’. The only real struggle for teaching the general public is the diversity in the classes. Our classes are open to anyone above the age of 16. You can imagine what it can be like to have 16 students all of different ages, cultural backgrounds and life experiences. Sometimes the banter between students needs to be stopped and the class is bought back to attention and the task at hand.

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

In your personal opinion what are some of the shortcomings in floral education that the industry should strive towards working on?

In Australia, this would definitely be the training package that is taught in Registered Training Organizations (RTO). If you wish to become a RTO, you must deliver the training package exactly as it is stated. 40-50% of what is in the Certificate III Training package is obsolete and would never be used in a 2015 commercial florist. I think the Training Package and the manner in which is is marked upon to deem someone ‘competent’ needs to be addressed in the future. We have chosen thus far, not to become an RTO because of not agreeing on what is to be taught. Our Industry Course has been developed to cover the crucial learning needed to enter the Industry, whether it be straight from school or later in life. There is also a strong oversight by commercial Florists when hiring, to look only at candidates who posses a Certificate. Some of the worlds best florists are not ‘qualified’, however their designs, speed and presentation far surpass the industry Standard. I know that more progressive business people, do indeed hire on the skills and standards of the candidate, not the piece of paper in a file. Again, with the current training package, even if the student is terrible, and RTO must pass them if they have ‘tried to complete the task’.

What do you do to keep your self-educated and on trend?

I do my best to attend all major worldwide competitions, conferences and summits each year. I also actively look weekly to what is trending on Social Media and in Fashion Blogs and Magazines to try and pre-empt the classes that will be required for my school on a particular technique. An example is, when Kokedama made a comeback in Harpers Bazaar in 2013 (then trickling to Blogs, Social Media etc.), I immediately scheduled a Kokedama workshop within the coming months. I also work closely with other educators, particular Joseph Massie of the UK School of Floristry. We often ‘compare notes’ as to the content of what we’re teaching and how it is being taught.

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

How would you say floral education differs in Australia than floral education in the rest of the world?

The Floristry Industry is unregulated in Australia. Therefore you do not ‘need’ to have a Certificate III, IV or Diploma to obtain work or run your own business. Therefore anyone can offer training, open a school or conduct workshops. This is good and bad. I feel it would be great if the was somewhat of a governing body, but not exactly ‘regulated’. For example, someone who completes a class at my school, it would be nice if they were able to sit exams and get ‘rated’ by a governing body for their skills (similar to AIFD). Australia follows multiple trends. European, Asian and American. This does make it a little more diverse with setting training plans. In the past, Australia has been heavily influenced by very traditional English Floral Design. Hence why this has become somewhat obsolete, as the younger generation (or what we call ‘our current customer’) wants products that are a lot more stylish and modern. The only thing that is really the same worldwide are the Principles and Elements of Design.

What floral topics do you feel in your personal opinion are either over taught or need to be focused on more?

I personally think the number one topic should be ‘How to maintain our Industry’. This is a luxury product in a climate with a future that is unknown. It’s all very well to teach techniques, designs and how to cost and market them effectively. But do those designs have a place in the future of our industry or are we focusing too much on a trend that will only last months? There is also a decline in the knowledge of Botanical names and Variety knowledge. There are too many people referring to things in our industry with little or no knowledge of their history or how they grow and should be cared for post-harvest. We should be referring to something like a Red Rose as a ‘Grand Prix Rose’ or an ‘Adrenaline Rose’ not just a ‘Long stemmed Red’. It is like the difference of seeing a Doctor. You pay more to see a specialist than you do to see a General Practitioner. Each Floral Designer should be striving to have the product knowledge of a ‘Specialist’ and charge accordingly.

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

How would you like to see floral education evolve over the next 5 years?

I would love to see a little more of a commitment in education moving forward. There is a difference in simply ‘delivering a course’ and ‘teaching a student’. To be honest, I think the dead wood that needs to be weeded out of the teachers in Australian Floristry Schools, will reach natural attrition within these years. Younger, more progressive teachers like myself are now seen to be far more successful than older generation, with perhaps more traditional teaching methods.

What do you hope your students take away from your training?

A little piece of my passion. I am incredibly dedicated and passionate about this Industry and also our craft. I try to go above and beyond with my students and always give them my 100%. I hope my students not only take away the skills we’re teaching them, but also some dedication and commitment to advance their skills and be more successful personally or professionally.

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

Photo Property of Matthew Landers

What do you think are some of the top floral educational advancements that have helped progress the industry?

I think the shining star in this would be Social Media. Instagram, Facebook, Blogs, Pinterest etc. This has enabled a product to go viral and become a worldwide phenomenon in the touch of a finger. If Beyoncé is wearing a Flower Crown, suddenly, everyone wants to wear a flower crown. Floral Designers are quick to criticise people working from home and also offering DIY on Blogs and Video Tutorial. I think the point here is missed. They’re promoting Flowers. People are engaged and loving flowers and Floral Design. Rather than being insecure, they should be proactive in their business and realizing there is perhaps another market they could tap into. Social Media has also allowed us to tap into what is trending in other parts of the world without having to wait day, weeks or months for a new book or magazine. You can monitor the success of what you’re producing and also the engagement with the audience. People aren’t shy to tell you what they think. There are many blogs that have wonderful, educational tips for florists and general public that will enable them to either make more informed buying choices, use different or learn new techniques and also forecast upcoming trends.

Of the floral educators around the world, who are your top 3 and why?

In no particular order.

Gregor Lersch – Germany : Gregor is like the Yves Saint Laurent of the Floristry Industry. He broke the rules, then re-wrote them. He did what everyone else was too scared to do. He educates with a level of passion and dedication that oozes out of every fibre of his being. A legend in our industry and a true inspiration.

Gregory Milner – Australia : Greg’s mother Marjorie Milner was a pioneer of education in Australia, starting Marjorie Milner College in Melbourne. Greg has taken this college from strength to strength. Greg is responsible for Australia having a lot of the education it does today. Along with a range of videos and books his passion is visible in each and every interaction.

Joseph Massie – England : Joe, similarly to myself started young and has achieved a lot. Joe is also what I consider the ‘new generation’. After his recent acquisition of the UK School of Floristry, I invited him to come to Australia to be a guest demonstrator and workshop tutor for my school in 4 Australian cities. Joe excelled on delivering ‘current’ and relevant information about the industry and its trends.

ML_ACADEMY_RGB

Website: www.matthewlanders.com
Email: sales@matthewlanders.com
Phone: +61 8 9355 5369

Social Media

Facebook
Instagram

As a fresh breath into Floral Education, Floral.today looks forward to the day that we get to personally work with Matthew Landers and his forward thinking Matthew Landers Academy. Thank you to Matthew for taking the time to share with us an Australian perspective on the state of Floral Education and we look forward to the inspiring floral future he is working towards. Check out all the links above to stay in the know with all things Matthew Landers .

Siignature

Feature Designer, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI – From Educator to Advisor

Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI is one of those unique floral educators that put not only time into educating the future of our industry but also her time into building her successful floral business Meadowscent! Throughout all of it though Theresa has faced the saddening decline of collegiate floral design programs going from teaching floral design at the State University of N.Y. At Cobleskill and at the NY botanical gardens to becoming the SAIFD Advisor to the rural Upstate, New York school. As a SAIFD Advisor, Theresa still inspires future floral designers and growth in the industry.

Photo Protperty of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

Photo Property of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

YOU CAN FIND ALL THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE
What advantages do feel SAIFD chapters provide that normal college programs do not?

Having the support of AIFD provides us with many educational and industry opportunities. We host guest AIFD designers to work with students for our Artist in Residence program, our students attend National symposium to compete with other SAIFD colleges and take advantage of our educational shows. This symposium also provides the students the opportunity to work side by side with world renown designers on designs for their programs.

What struggles have you found university and college programs have faced in recent years?

The number of students interested in floral design has declined, therefore making it difficult for the colleges to continue their programs.

Photo Protperty of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

Photo Property of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

In your personal opinion what are some of the shortcomings in floral education that the industry should strive towards working on?

I think the industry needs to support floral education programs as best they can. There is a lapse in age of people taking on floral design careers. We need to invest in our college students as well as current florists furthering their careers, in order to keep our industry alive. Education is the best way to help floral design flourish.

What has been one of the most interesting floral topics you have taught so far in your career?

Because working with flowers is appealing to many, we often see people opening flower shops that have no real design skills or business skills for the floral industry. I find it most interesting to teach industry business skills to this group. If the desire to design is there, you won’t stay in business very long if you can’t turn a profit. Teaching these skills are a vital part of keeping our retail florists in business and creating opportunities for floral entrepreneurs.

Photo Protperty of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

Photo Property of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

As a past instructor of State University of N.Y. At Cobleskill, what did you find to be the most challenging part of running a floral program?

It’s difficult to run a program with a very tight budget. In order to keep floral design relevant, you need to show the students new products in our market. These can be costly and often impossible for most programs to afford. This would be an area that the industry could lend support to. Manufacturers, growers and wholesalers would benefit to have their products being used by students who are the future of our industry.

Do you have a philosophy when it comes to floral education?

Exposure to the floral industry globally. Whenever I have the chance I let the student see how large our industry is and that it goes beyond a mom and pop shop in your hometown. Exploring all facets of the floral industry worldwide creates an excitement and possibilities for them to find careers.

Photo Protperty of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

Photo Property of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

With our ever-changing industry, where have you seen the floral industry change the most over the past 5-10 years?

Sadly, I think consumers have lost a lot of faith in Florists. Order gatherers and wire services have promised the consumers more than the retail florist can deliver and as a result our consumers have been dissatisfied. Retail florists need to do everything they can to provide quality customer service with excellent product in order to regain the consumers trust. It may not be an easy task, but it needs to be done on every order and every customer that chooses to do business with you.

What advice do you have for designers looking to become floral educators or presenters?

Continually educating yourself should be your priority. Advance your career to AIFD, and PFCI. Become a member of the Society of American Florists. Take classes from other designers. Travel to other countries to experience cultural differences with flowers.. The educational opportunities are endless. Experience them and share them with others!

Photo Protperty of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

Photo Protperty of Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

What do you think are some of the top floral educational advancements that have helped progress the industry?

I truly believe in The American Institute of Floral Designers. They are dedicated to the advancement of floral education to the individual, the student, the public and the industry. I believe the standards they uphold continually cause designers to strive to be some of the best designers in the world.

With your extensive floral education knowledge, along with your AIFD and PFCI accreditations, where would you like to take your experience and skill to further educate the industry?

Flowers and nature should be a part of everyone’s lives. We, as florist’s know it. Dozens of studies have documented the benefits of flowers in our lives. European and Asian cultures understand it. I want the United States to grasp it. I hope that by educating with my enthusiasm for the industry, it will trickle down from growers to retail florists and students to the consumer and we will become a nation of flower buyers!


Theresa Colucci AIFD, PFCI

Website: meadowscent.com
Email: theresa@meadowscent.com
Phone: 845-255-3866
845-255-3910

Facebook

 

Thank you to Theresa for sharing with us her passion and thoughts on Floral Education. Best of luck to her and her SAIFD Chapter with it’s endeavors this year and in the future.

As we finish up Floral Education Month, make sure to share with Floral.today what you enjoyed the most!

Siignature

Feature Designer, Featured Floral School, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

College of Southern Nevada – Chieko Fukushima AIFD, CFD

Chieko Fukushima AIFD, CFD is the SAIFD Advisor and educator at the College of Southern Nevada and is striving to grow industry awareness for not just the public but also future floral design generations. Through contests, industry involvement and awareness, Chieko gives the full experience to her students for them to confidently go into floral industry careers.

Dustin 2

YOU CAN FIND ALL THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE college of Southern nevada AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE
As a SAIFD Advisor, do think schools show enough support to SAIFD Chapters?

Our school has been gracious in financial support for travel expenses for those that participate in Student Design Competitions. I have took over CSN Floral Design Technology program in 2009 and advised the team of SAIFD that won the “Best of the Best” highest score of the school at Student Design Competition. Ever since, our SAIFD has won many awards and two of member were inducted into AIFD at Chicago and two were awarded CFD in 2014. I am showing actual proof to school administration that through demonstrating the methods and cultivate student skills, creating a mind set for their achievement.

Dustin 1

What advice do you have for professional floral designers looking to be advisors or floral educators?

As professional floral designers you need to advance consistently and reach out for new trends and upgrade your skills. Do not contend who you are, share your new knowledge with your students.

Dustin 6

With university level floral education, where do see most students focusing their future career goals?

They should not just be a professional floral designer employed by someone, students should focus to have and own established business ventures as florists, event companies, wedding consultant/planner and instructors.

What has been one of the most interesting floral topics you have taught so far in your career?

Every two years I  teach the subject “Creativity & Competition”, which I am very interested to bring out individual hidden talents from each students. I have deep satisfaction when I find one in students which gives them confident and strive toward their goals. I enjoy bringing out each students quality and develop their individual skills.

IMG_3983
Do you have a philosophy when it comes to floral education

My advice to all my student is to have “CREATIVE MINDS AND CHALLENGING SPIRITS”

IMG_3984

What major differences have you found when educating professional designers verses student designers?

I found so called professional designers show their arrogance and highly over confident that they know everything but they don’t. Some professional designer doesn’t share their knowledge. Their mentalities are so selfish, since they paid large sum of fee to learn, why should they have to share information to non-paying people. One of my old colleague was afraid to share anything due to lack of self-security. Student designer are so curious and wants to know everything to obtain new information and techniques.

With our ever-changing industry, how have you seen floral education change in the past 5-10 years?

I have owned a full service florist in California for 8 years and have attend all classes offered by FTD and Teleflora educational programs. I have noticed some trade shows just have a few professional’s showing off designs not sellable for florist. Some education requires you to scale down to encourage florist to make a profit. It’s nice to educate three different designs for upgrading for sale price.

IMG_3990

In your personal opinion what are some of the shortcomings in floral education that the industry should strive towards working on?

Local wholesalers and schools should get together to have more education for the general public and young students to introduce our Floral Industry. One of our Wholesaler sponsors the event “Art in Bloom”, allowing professionals, and students to design their inspiration from Paintings. Then the public judges for the People Choice Award.

When advising SAIFD students, what do you personally think are the most important ways to keep their interest for future careers in the industry?

I feel it’s the best idea to focus on the Floral Industry. Also, I believe that if the students are interested in this floral industry, I would encourage other subjects like business (Accounting), English (Public Speaking), Math ( business math), Information System ( Office, Excel, Power point), and photography.

Dustin 4

What do you think are some of the top floral educational advancements that have helped progress the industry?

PFDE is the best floral education advancement and all the AIFD National Symposium programs.

Each district chapter of FTD and Teleflora should have more educational programs.

IMG_3876


College of Southern Nevada

Website: www.csn.edu
Email: chieko.fukushima@csn.edu
Phone: (702) 651-4207

Course Detail

 

Good luck to Chieko and her students this year in their SAIFD contests and thank you again for sharing with us. Make sure to go support the Student American Institute of Floral Design Chapters in your area, as you will be supporting the future of our industry. You can find all the information about SAIFD HERE!

Till Next Time,

Siignature

Feature Designer, Featured Floral School, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

Joseph Delarge -Seneca College / eco|stems

 One of the great hidden gems of Canadian floral education is hidden right in the heart of Toronto and that gems name is Joseph Delarge! Joseph is the owner of Toronto’s only environmentally and socially sustainable flower shop where you can find only local, organic and/or fair-trade flowers and plants. Along with his successful business Joseph is the Botany Instructor in the Floral Design Program at Seneca College also located in Toronto, Canada. 

Me making a handmade Red Dogwood wreath.

Me making a handmade Red Dogwood wreath.

YOU CAN FIND ALL THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE FLORAL DESIGN INSTITUTE AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE
What major differences do you find when presenting floral education at a university level verses doing workshops at your shop, eco|stems?

In the workshops we hold at the shop our focus is more on the practical and allowing people to make something pretty to take home with them. We cover a bit of the theory specific to the design they’ve made, whether it’s a floral or plant design. The people coming to our in-store workshops are typically doing it for the experience often with a friend or family member.

I would encourage anyone looking to make a career of it to enroll at Seneca or similar. At the college it’s a bit more involved for the student. For 8 months the students have a full-time college schedule of design theory and practical, botany, art, sketching, customer service classes etc. that have different theory/practical ratios. My Botany class is 3 hours every week for 4 months. Each class is about 2/3 theory and 1/3 practical but the amount of theory covered ensures they are spending many hours outside of class studying. They’re there to learn for their future career. The education is intense and thorough!

Joseph Teaching a Workshop at The Toronto Botanical Garden

Joseph Teaching a Workshop at The Toronto Botanical Garden

What advice do you have for designers looking to become a floral educator or presenter?

I’d say it takes a diverse knowledge, experience and a certain level of expertise. I have a varied horticultural background. I grew up on a farm always in the forests, fields, veggie gardens and flower beds. Went to school for greenhouse horticulture at Niagara College and floral design at Seneca. I’ve worked in greenhouses, landscaping and in many flower shops. I’m always learning! To be a teacher you have to always be building on your knowledge and skills. And I’m always taking every opportunity I can get to be up in-front of a crowd talking about flowers and plants.

Rose-hip armature vase arrangement. No foam.

Rose-hip armature vase arrangement. No foam.

With our ever-changing industry, where do you hope see floral education heading in the next 5-10 years?

I see a glut of floral education programs that don’t even come close to preparing the students for a life in this industry. A lot of people in this industry don’t have a complete grasp of the basic skills it takes to be a well rounded florist. I hope to see a better and more intense focus on the basics. If we train people to be experts in this industry we’ll all be better off.

Photo Property of eco | stems

Photo Property of eco | stems

What do you think are some of the top floral educational advancements that have helped progress the industry?

The internet and all it brings has proven to be a great tool to connect people and learn from each other. It would have to be the top educational advancement.

Photo Property of eco | stems

Photo Property of eco | stems

As a floral designer and educator that values using local, organic and fair trade products, do ever find the industry lacking in the area of more natural and clean practices and the educational opportunities presenting them?

Sustainability within the floral industry is lacking to say the least! Although I think things are definitely improving, it’s so wasteful and harmful to people and the planet in a lot of areas. I started eco|stems to show that there are ways to do things differently. And I’ve proven that it can be done! I am always finding ways to inject a little sustainability into my lessons. It’s a challenge. Saying that, it’s our responsibility as an industry to do our part to lesson or even eliminate any negative impact we may have on the planet and the people we live with on it! You have to be the change you want to see in the world.

Veriflora and Rainforest Alliance fair-trade certifications.

Veriflora and Rainforest Alliance fair-trade certifications.

What has been one of the most interesting floral topics you have taught so far in your career?

Kokedama – a very cool form of Japanese Bonsai has been the most interesting thing to teach so far. Google it. I think you’ll see it become a big thing in plant design in the near future!

In your personal opinion what are some of the shortcomings in floral education that the industry should strive towards working on?

Nomenclature, wiring and taping, hand-tied bouquets, armatures, potted plants are a few specific areas of floristry that I feel a lot of florists have trouble with. There’s definitely room for improvement.

A nest like armature bouquet made for Canadian Florist Magazine in 2014

A nest like armature bouquet made for Canadian Florist Magazine in 2014

Do you have a philosophy when it comes to floral education?

No philosophy I live by. I just try to be a source of information and inspiration for my students. I hope that inspires them to do great things with flowers and plants!

eco | stem Everyday Design

eco | stem Everyday Design

If you could teach or educate the floral industry on any topic, what would your dream topic be?

My dream topic would have to be armatures! How to build them and how to work them into your designs. I have taught this subject a couple of times, it was fantastic! I’ve never been able to explore it in the detail that I would like to with a class.

Floral Art installation From Canada Blooms 2014 To The Theme "Wild".

Floral Art installation From Canada Blooms 2014 To The Theme “Wild”.

How do you think floral educators could advance the presence of the floral industry to the public through education?

Floral educators need to live and breathe flowers and plants! If you have a passion for it people will see and it will be infectious! It can be as simple as having workshops. It allows the public to see all of the work and skill that goes into the beauty we create. That works wonders! Make sure the information you are providing is accurate and up to date! Providing incomplete or inaccurate information is one of the easiest ways to turn people off of the floral industry. You need to always be learning especially if you are going to teach.


eco|stems

Website: ecostems.ca
Email: info@ecostems.ca
Phone: 416-214-6479
Workshops

Social Media
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
Google+
Tumblr


Seneca College

Website: www.senecacollege.ca
Floral Program Website: www.senecacollege.ca/fulltime/FDN
Email: admissions@senecacollege.ca
Phone: (416) 491-5050 Ext. 22840

 

Thank you to Joseph for bringing a clean industry perspective to floral education, Floral.today looks forward to the next time we get to enjoy Joseph’s designs and industry perspectives. Make sure to follow Joseph with the links above for some truly beautiful design and to see if the 2 Semester Floral Program is for you.

Enjoy the Rest of Your Floral Education Month,

Siignature

Feature Designer, Featured Floral School, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

Kathy Freeman-Hastings FDI – Floral Design Institute

With 12 years of floral education under her belt at the Floral Design Institute and a degree in fine arts, you can bet the Kathy Freeman-Hastings FDI is going to treat you to an amazing design course. You can expect a fun class atmosphere and a high level of expertise when taking her courses. Check out all the courses Kathy will be instructing this year and sign up today!

Floral Design Institute Director – Kathy Freeman-Hastings FDI

Floral Design Institute Director – Kathy Freeman-Hastings FDI

YOU CAN FIND ALL THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE FLORAL DESIGN INSTITUTE AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE
What defines a Floral Design Institute educator?

A passion for floral design and the desire to share that passion!

Photo Property of Floral Design Institute

Photo Property of Floral Design Institute

What has been one of the most interesting floral topics you have taught so far in your career?

Foliage manipulation techniques and the importance of line in design.

What floral topics do you think are over taught or not taught enough in the floral industry?

Clear vase design and hand tied bouquets

Photo Property of Floral Design Institute

Photo Property of Floral Design Institute

What advice do you have for designers looking to become a floral educator or presenter?

Try to learn to talk about what you are doing and why as your hands are working – be clear and concise. It is also important to be able to connect with your audience/students: humor and eye contact.

In your personal opinion what are some of the shortcomings in floral education that the industry should strive towards working on?

Working on speed in designing.

Floral Design Institute Instructors

Floral Design Institute Instructors


Floral Design Institute

Website: www.floraldesigninstitute.com
Phone: 1-800-819-8089
        1-503-223-8089
Email: info@floraldesigninstitute.com

Social Media
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Instagram
Youtube

Course Schedule

 

Floral.today is thankful to Kathy and all the Floral Design Institute Instructors that were able to find the time for our viewers and to take part in Floral Education Month. Check out all that Floral Design Institute has to offer with the links above and show your support for one of the industries top floral industry schools.

Feature Designer, Featured Floral School, Floral Companies, Floral Education Month, Industry Events

Beth Lane FDI – Floral Design Institute

 

Like many great designers Beth Lane FDI started out as a a delivery driver and has worked very hard to get where she is today, a Floral Design Institute Instructor. With over 35 years of experience throughout the industry Beth has gained experience and knowledge that has prepared her to be a great floral educator.

What defines a Floral Design Institute educator?

A person with a good work ethic. A team player – someone who not only has many years of floral knowledge and skill but someone who can be encouraging and is able to meet students where they’re at.

What has been one of the most interesting floral topics you have taught so far in your career?

I actually enjoy teaching about sympathy design. Some people are uncomfortable about this subject. It is a fact of life my perspective is that it is an “honor” to be part of the final tribute.

Photo Property of Floral Design Institute

Photo Property of Floral Design Institute

Do you have a philosophy when it comes to floral education?

For me, it is a privilege to be able to come along side our students. Many have dreamt of floral school for a very long time and we get to be part of that dream. Philosophy: Be kind and encourage.

What floral topics do you think are over taught or not taught enough in the floral industry?

Well… that’s top secret.

What difficulties do floral institutes face that floral shops and companies don’t face?

Floral schools have an ever changing population. We have students from literally all over the world. Communication is key in terms of speaking clearly, slowly and in understanding the students response.

What advice do you have for designers looking to become a floral educator or presenter?

You better like people! We ALL bring something to the table. Teachers must embrace the differences.

What do you think are some of the top floral educational advancements that have helped progress the industry?

Internet and specifically social media is huge in terms of networking with other designers in and outside of the country. The awareness and sharing of new things and techniques is but a click away.

How do you believe the US could increase it’s industry awareness to attract younger designers?

I want to see flowers at the Oscars, Golden Globes, Emmy, and SAG. At the ceremonies, not just the parties…more visibility overall.

Floral Design Institute Instructors

Floral Design Institute Instructors

Floral Design Institute

Website: www.floraldesigninstitute.com
Phone: 1-800-819-8089
        1-503-223-8089
Email: info@floraldesigninstitute.com

Social Media
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Instagram
Youtube

Course Schedule

 

Thank you to Beth for taking dome time for Floral Education Month. You can contact the Floral Design Institute for all Beth’s course details.

Siignature